The Caliche Times

Jerry Davis

Guide by Topics

Volume 2


Double Click on the Following links to find your way to the topics:
The Caliche Times Vol  2,   No 1   7/30/99
Smoky Haze
Peanuts a Crop of the Past
Emus just Hang Around
Nutria and Beaver
Feral Hogs and Dogs
Llama Guards
New Mexico, that other Country
No Rain - No Gain
Beer Bottles in Vogue
Uncle Ray McCoy and the Guadulape Pass
Rattle a Bucket of Water and Bring a Fly Swatter
Definition of Terms
The Caliche Times Vol  2,   No 2   08/15/99
Mud Sucking Cows
Fungus Amongus
Tow Sacks and stickerburrs
Armadillos can Drive a Man to Drink
Raymond Shults Worked as a Butcher at Agnew Grocery
James, JFrank and Ping Pong
Definition of Terms

The Caliche Times Vol   2, No 3   08/31/99

Papiermache Nests and Aliens
Giant Mud Daubers
The Cow That Got Caught
Shhh
OK, Spivy, I am Not Calling The Vet
Follow the Rooster Tail
Long tailed heifers
Definition of Terms

The Caliche Times Vol  2,  No   4    9/5/99

Bush Hogs and Flint Rocks
Comments about "The Cow that got Caught" and others:
"There's Nothing to it, It Will just Slip Right Off"
Hunting Leases Available
Ants Make a Move
The Stuck Up Hoot Owl
The Approach
The Steel Glare With No Soul
Torn Flesh and Hopeless Entanglement
The Owl Crunched Down
Sinbad The Cowdog Makes Observation
She Flew The Coop and Gave a Hoot
Definition of Terms
The Caliche Times Vol  2, No  5     9/9/99
It Went Bump in The Night
Cows on The Honor System
Sinbad Doesn't let Guard Duties Interfere With Naps
"Sinbad, you need to project better"
The Eyes of the Heifer Told a Story
"Sinbad, we have to have a good plan."
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The Caliche Times Vol 2, No 1   7/30/99

 

 

5/23/99

Smoky Haze

I understand from my relatives that the atmosphere down on the coast of Texas has also been very smoky hazy in the last few weeks. The burn-offs in the Mexican states of Nuevo Leon and Tamauilipas sort of closed in on Corpus Christi and the Coastal Bend. They didn’t know it but it came here as well. You will recall last summer the burn-offs in Mexico got out of control and created hundreds of forest and range fires and we shared the smoke from those areas. Health warnings were issued in some areas.
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Peanuts, a Crop of the Past

The dust and smoke has settled a lot here in Eastland County now. Most of the peanut quota was sold to West Texas counties so most of the dust blowing your way is coming from the plowed fields out in West Texas. Our county is cultivated now to plant crops for grazing animals. Peanuts are a crop of the past for this county. We have lots of grazing animals now such as cows, Llamas, Emus and wild hogs. We don’t have to travel out of town anymore to see animals that should be in a zoo someplace.
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Emus just Hang Around

You can see Emus occasionally just walking around like they belong here. Apparently they don’t fly they just hang around. If they could fly they could join the Sand Hill Cranes and at least help with the peanut harvest in West Texas…. we don’t have anything for them to eat around here. Maybe we will discover they like grassburrs.
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Nutria and Beaver

We have visits sometimes by nutria and beaver and some people say "Yeah, sure you have beaver." We don’t care, we know the difference. You can see a large beaver lodge just below the Pioneer Lake Dam as you drive by on Hwy 36.
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Feral Hogs and Dogs

The feral hogs have made their way into many refrigerators this year north of us and we don’t look forward to having to harvest them if they move farther south. I guess a little for sausage won’t hurt though. An interesting note from Austin "State Rep. Ron Wilson, D-Houston, filed legislation to outlaw hog-dog fights. The proposed ban drew the praise of animal rights advocates. It also drew the condemnation of some farmers and ranchers who use dogs to hunt down crop-destroying, livestock-killing and property-damaging feral hogs. Wilson said his intention is not to curb the use of dogs for hunting. The purpose of the bill, he said, is only to stop the penning of hogs and dogs together to make them fight." A man can’t have any macho sports anymore.
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Llama Guards

Just up the county from us you can see and visit a Llama farm that has been in business for many years now. The same fellow Dean Madison (who went to school in Rising Star and whom you might know) just recently put in a new and very nice floral shop across the street from the First Baptist Church in Rising Star. Now that is diversified farming. I understand there is a market for the Llama to help protect goats from predators. The flower shop business goes in as a competition flower shop with the Rising Star Flower shop that belongs to Monty Jones (whom many of you will remember from the Jones Feed Store of many years ago.)
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7/30/99

New Mexico, that other Country

We left the country just a couple of weeks ago and went to New Mexico. New Mexico is a different country, you know. If you read their magazine you find that many people are not sure if New Mexico is part of the United States. As far as we are concerned it is a nice country and full of some really friendly folks. We traveled there as members of the Central Texas Gem and Mineral Club. Fourteen members and one guest made the trip. New Mexico, that other country! We made a rendezvous with our other club members in Glenwood, NM. We spent several days following mountain roads and valleys going to destinations to find specific rocks and minerals. It rained almost every afternoon and we enjoyed the cooler weather. Lou Jane really enjoyed her first extended trailer trip.
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No Rain - No Gain

We have some relatives that live in New Mexico and some that are part time residents of Ruidoso.   By contrast, if you live in the desert foot hills right below the mountains, like in Hobbs, NM or Denver City, you have to have a sense of humor about the weather.   Dois Maness said that it usually rains about 5-10 inches a year and they already had their quota for this year.  So my brilliant comment was "You don’t have much run off water with that kind of rainfall do you?" He said "No, the water hardly every runs here."   I spend a lot of time thinking about run off water because we haven’t had significant run off water since July 4, 1999.  Oh, I had one new stock tank that I had dug last year to get full and "run over" but a week later it was dry again. Had a hole in the bottom, I guess.   So much for the new tank, it looks good but a tank with a hole in it is just an expensive hole in the ground.
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Beer Bottles in Vogue

We had a good visit with Dois and Florence and they drove us over to Denver City. Cousin Willie Mae drove us over to see her daughter Sandi and to see their new residence in the suburbs of Denver City.  Well, we even visited some with her husband David who had, three days before, been appointed the new junior high principal.  He still liked the job.   David said that even with all his new responsibilities he would still find time to send me another email sometime this year or next year.  He said on second thought, he was slightly offended at my use of the term "Beer Hunters" in previous emails.  Well, life gets boring out here sometimes and for entertainment as we drive home over the country roads we see how many beer cans can be flattened by driving over them.  Then in the next few days, we can pick them up for recycle.  The fun has been taken out of that sport though because as Lou Jane informed me "beer bottles are more in vogue now" and have now become the thing to throw down on the road during a good tailgate party.  I guess a good beer, BS and a pack of cigarettes about tops off a good evening here in redneck country.
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Uncle Ray McCoy and El Capitan

Lou Jane and I went to Dell City, Texas on our way to New Mexico and spend two days with her Uncle Ray McCoy who is 89 years young. Mr. McCoy ("Uncle Ray") and his sons live in the irrigated portion of the desert just below Guadulape Pass or El Capitan the tallest mountain in Texas. Mr. McCoy has always been goal oriented, ambitious fellow or is that redundant. I won’t go into all his background but to say that on or about his 80th birthday he had his Grandkids go with him and he climbed ole El Capitan and put his name in the book at the top of the mountain. Right now he is writing his memoirs. The days we were there, knee-high Alfalfa was being cut for hay. After it cures then it will be baled into 1 ton square bales. All the baling is done at night to maintain the right moisture content. They hire the baling done because the equipment costs around $600,000. If you bale Alfalfa during the heat of the day the leaves will drop off the stems and be lost. All the irrigation there is done with crevice water. Farmers in Dell City prefer not to have any rain because rain splashes alkali soil on the plants and hurts the quality of the hay.
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Rattle a Bucket of Water and Bring a Fly Swatter

Well, y’all come see us. The thermometer is sitting on 103 as I write this and was on 104 at this time yesterday. If you come be sure to bring a fan and a sprinkle of water.   It used to be that all we had to do to get the cows to come to the house was to rattle a bucket of cubes, but times have changed and now we just rattle a bucket of water and a fly swatter.
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The Caliche Times Vol 2, No 2   08/15/99

 

Mud Sucking Cows

Well, makes me feel a little odd to see the North East going through a drought. They haven’t had rain in over two months and are listed in the severe drought zone. (In the fifties we called it a "drouth.") We haven’t had a rain in 13 months and 11 days. I guess it dries out faster up North. Our ole cows have been sucking water out of mud for the past few months and then spitting out the mud. Well, I guess the stories are just a little better down here in Texas.
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Fungus Amongus

Getting ready to make another trip to Dell City, TX real soon.  Guess me and the real McCoys can share dust stories again.  We have reached a new level of refinement here with the powdered caliche roads since we haven’t had any rain to wash them.   The dust is so fine now you see locus stirring up dust as they fly over the road.   Grasshoppers become "locusts" during times of drought as you see thousands of them flying from one field to the next, their wings fluttering and reflecting the sunlight.  You might even hear them clacking their mandibles together if you listen close enough.  The only thing that will kill grasshoppers in mass, when they are in the locust mode, is a good rain.  They get a lung fungus and die off. So what we need is a "fungus amongus".
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Tow Sacks and Stickerburrs

Well, we had traffic yesterday out here on caliche road(Okra Ave.). The pickup belonged to my cousin James Shults. James drives in from Keller Texas to mow his yard (on the homeplace) about twice a year, probably more on years it rains. Yeah, we get enough moisture to grow weeds, especially Pig Weeds(Careless Weeds), sticktites and grassburrs. Wish the Yankees would hurry up and invent some uses for the devil’s nest eggs. We here in the "scenic south" would do that if we didn’t have to spend so much time picking them out of our tennis shoe strings. Every time I think about developing a gadget for harvesting grassburrs, I am reminded of the method that dad used to harvest yellow sweet clover burrs in the cow pasture. Back then, we had "tow sacks". Dad would get several of them and line them up across the tractor equipment and drive through pasture. The burrs from the clover would stick to the burlap bags and then we could just clean them off the bags and store the seed. Needless to say, that bit of diversified farming was short lived.
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Armadillos can Drive a Man to Drink

I get a lot of questions about hunting in this area. We hunt in the abstract here. I go out late at night and early in the morning to hunt for "yard pigs" (armadillos) and copperheads. Went out early this morning to check my "yard pig" trap but found a skunk harvesting crickets under the yard light. We still have the armadillos but one less skunk. Armadillos can drive a man to drink. They get up about 4 in the morning and destroy all the yard where you watered it the night before. By the time I get outside with my shotgun, they have their bellies full and have gone back to bed. You can’t win though with yard work in dry weather. The parts of the yard that the armadillos don’t dig up at night, are taken care of during the day by Sinbad The Cowdog. In warm weather he has to dig a new hole in the yard every few minutes. So with yard pigs and Sinbad helping, the yard gets plowed and the result looks like a miniature mine field. We just let Sinbad keep digging though because if you say anything to him about the holes he just stops digging and his eyes just well up with tears. So how important is the yard anyway. You have to wash the dust off the grass if you want to show it to someone.
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Raymond Shults Worked as a Butcher at Agnew Grocery

So while James was stopped here with his lawnmower in tow, we talked about a lot of things like when he was a kid they lived at Amity, TX. But my favorite story was one he told about when his dad Raymond Shults worked as a butcher at Agnew Grocery store. James said "When I was about 1 year old we lived in Rising Star across and down the street about a block or so west from the store. One day I got out of the house and crossed Hwy 183 to go see my dad working in the store. I got into a lot of trouble over that."
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James, JFrank and Ping Pong

Well, another story James told and I had him tell it twice about how he beat Jay Frank several games of ping pong at the last Davis Reunion. I may want to hear that one again some time. Smile. We also talked about possible locations for the reunion next summer. We like the third weekend in June and Bandera or Brownwood lake as possible locations. Those of you that haven’t been coming to the Davis reunions, (I am sorry that I missed several myself) have missed the tournaments of ping pong, dominoes, forty two, eighty eight, foosball, hearts, crazy hearts, talent show, horse back riding, horseshoes, golf and lots of good food, stories and fellowship. If you bring a notebook you can get a list of all the kids and grandkids. We ran out of film last year just trying to get all of J Frank and Pat’s.

Y’all come see us if the dust settles.


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The Caliche Times Vol 2, No 3   8/31/99

 

Papiermache Nests and Aliens

 

We like to talk about dry weather, low stock water and dusty roads during droughty times but one final observation of things that are different has to do with changes in spider habits. Days when the temperature has been between 100 and 107 degrees, of which there have been many this month of August, the tan orb weaver spiders(Furrow and Barn Spiders) have been hanging down off the buildings out of their daytime hiding places. The Black Widow spiders, in great abundance, are normally not easy to see in the day time but are out in the middle of their web and very obvious during the day. I guess it is just to hot to go to go to bed and pull up the covers. We have also seen changes in other insects, such as the red and yellow wasps (city dudes call them bees) that’s OK, no offense intended that’s just the way it is, wasps are wasps and bees are bees . They (the wasps) have not been able to build large nests like they normally do. Maybe because they would have to haul water from long distances to make papiermache nests. These wasps like to mix a little cedar bark shavings or other wood shavings, water and spit together to build the very nice and durable honeycomb nest to raise their young in. Their nests have been very small and the wasps have a "I don’t care attitude" during this hot weather. This has made the wasp-killing hornets very happy. They have been working full time dragging the unsuspecting wasps into their small tunnel in the ground where they are stored in suspended animation until the wasp killer’s eggs hatch and begin to feed on them. If you have seen the movie "Alien" you have a good mental picture of this "cocoon and suspended animation process." The mud daubers also collect all the small spiders that they can shove into their clay, honey-comb structured nests and then lay eggs in with the spiders. When the eggs hatch the larva feed on the spiders which are still alive. I’m glad they have an appetite for spiders --- it’s like the fellow from Louisiana said that works for me "You would have to make a lot of gumbo to get rid of them yourself." He said, "You know, if you order gumbo down in Louisiana and it tastes good you don’t ever ask questions about the ingredients." I said, "I’m glad to hear that and I will try to remember it too." I figure he is an authority on the subject since he worked in the oil field down there.

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Giant Mud Daubers

Made a mistake the other day and started watering the yard to see what would happen. Next thing that happened was Barn Swallows came along and used the mud to build nests under the porch. They hadn’t been able to find enough mud until then. What a mess, if they could just be a little more careful and not drop mud on the car it wouldn’t be such a deal to put up with.
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The Cow That Got Caught

You know, when you live in close proximity to cattle and talk to them and listen to what they say, you begin to think you know a lot about them and think you have see it all. I decided this week that maybe there was more to see and understand about cattle. Late in the afternoon, I was near the barn and noticed a long-tailed heifer under the shed of the barn. She was the only member of the cattle herd anywhere around. Cows don't just hang around by themselves unless there is a reason to do so. This is a family herd that all grew up together and if one decides to jog, they all do. If one decides to drink, they all do. I decided that I better investigate this heifer and see why she suddenly decided to be a loner. So, I approached her. She could move around but wouldn’t get out from under the shed of the barn. As I went closer, I noticed she was "caught like a fish" on a short gate chain that had a full sized chain hook on the end. The hook was buried full up to its depth of about two inches in her nose. She was caught like a giant fish with sad eyes. Approaching any animal that is caught in a situation of entanglement can cause them to go into a shock of panic. My sudden nightmare vision caused me to see her jump back and rip off one side of her face if I tried to rescue her. I considered all the options and there weren’t any. I decided the only way to rescue her was to approach with a pair of bolt cutters and cut the chain, if she jumped back and ripped her face off it was still the only way; the chain had to be cut.
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Shhh

As I approached, she began to move back and tug on the chain. I think to myself, it is time to try some of that horse whispering even if she is a cow. Since I couldn’t think of anything clever, I decided to say something to her that she had never heard before and see if it would calm her down. So I said in a very small whisper, Shhh, Shhh, like I thought she would understand. She stopped tugging at that moment and looked at me as if to say, what are you talking about. During her moment of trying to understand me, I made the cut on the chain. She walked away free of the chain.
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OK, Spivy, I am Not Calling The Vet

She still had the hook in her nose as she walked away as I did a bit of wishful thinking like "Please Lord let the hook fall out now and let’s end this." I waited for an answer but none came. The hook stayed in her nose. I said "OK, Spivy, (she has sort of an original name) I am not calling the vet for this one so just get ready, it’s just you and me." So, I drove her into the squeeze chute and caught her head in the gate made for that purpose. If you think a cow trusts you more with their head caught in a head gate, just stop believing it. Her demeanor indicated the hook was not on her mind at the moment. I reached for the hook several times and she said "get your hands away from my nose." I am thinking, "this is not going as well as I had hoped for", but I didn’t tell her that. After a few minutes of frustration, both hers and mine, she finally allowed me to touch the hook and it lifted right out.   I turned her out to the pasture where she could forget the incident and heal properly. I saw her at the water trough two days later and I could tell she was trying to remember where she had seen me before.
Come see us, we are always at home.

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Follow the Rooster Tail

If you have trouble finding us, just follow the rooster tail of caliche dust across Texas and you soon will.   You can get to our house from anywhere in Texas if you drive long enough.


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The Caliche Times Vol  2, No   4    9/5/99

 

Brush Hogs and Flint Rocks

 

Well, this area is still dry and most grass is dead.  We are pasture mowing and trying to keep down the risk of fast moving fires.  We only mow if we have a 200 gallon orchard sprayer filled with water along side of the mowing.  If the brush hog  hits a flint rock maybe we will be on top of the situation and put out the fire in a hurry.  We are warned that with grass and weeds in its present condition that it isn’t likely that one can be stomp out a fire.  The flying sparks from the stomping activity will continue to fly ahead of the main source of the fire.
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Comments about "The Cow that got Caught" and others:

In reference to the story about the "Cow that got caught", my rockhound friend and cattleman, Don Brenholtz,  said "Them old cows may not know what you are saying to them, but it seems to calm them down if you talk in a soft voice. Don't hurt nuthin’ either if you happen to be the cowboy who brings some cubes around once in a while."

Our daughter Sharla "Boy howdy, that cow was lucky you found her. I'm glad she cooperated enough to let you get the hook out. "

Ron and Phyllis Graham: If anyone can't find your place in the trail of white dust, they'll arrive
at ours! 
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"There's Nothing to it,  It Will just Slip Right Off  ! "

 

Me and Louisiana Tom  have been finding a lot of use for the expression "There’s nothing to it, it will just slip right off."    When the double width bush hog broke down last week and we had to replace the double asbestos clutch pad,  we had a little trouble with the spline hub. The fellow at the Massey Furgerson dealership said "There’s nothing to, all you have to do is use a pry bar and put pressure on it and it will slip right off." Maybe it would have slipped off back during the days before rust. Tom and me stressed and strained over the spline hub that wouldn't budge for two days. We managed to tear everything else off the shredder until we were able to make room to replace parts we needed to replace.   Had to do some welding to get things back to normal but that old hub never did "Just slip right off."

 

Hunting Leases Available:
www.breckenridgetexas.com

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Ants Make a Move

 

We got 0.35 inch of rain this week (9/7/99).  All ants decided it was time for the colonies to spread.  Termites, Fire Ants, Red Harvester Ants, "Sugar Ants", Wood Ants and all others not mentioned, decided to make a move when the moisture was available.  We don't have anymore ants than we did before, just more homesteads now.  We have two "Horned Toads" and they are working full time during this move.  We had to quit poisioning ants because of the decreasing numbers of Horned Lizards.   The poison never did bother the ants anyway.  Poisoning ants just makes them nervous and they hide out for a few days.

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The Stuck Up Hoot Owl
or
The Owl that Didn't Give a Hoot

9/8/99

It was early in the morning when I noticed the large paper feed sack hanging on a fence by the road.  It seemed a little different than it did when I saw it in the ditch beside the road the day before.  A little while later, as I passed down the road, I could see that the piece of paper was something alive hanging on the fence.  Then I was close enough to see that it was an owl hanging there.  It's wing was entangled in the barbed wire. 
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The Approach

As I approached the owl, I could see that the animal had given up hope and had accepted its fate of being hung till death.  Birds don't take stress well and it would probably take only a short time compared to a mammal for it to "pass on by".   The eyes were dead-set on me as I fumbled through the toolbox of the pickup for a pair of leather gloves.  After putting on the leather gloves, I reached for the wing of the owl expecting the owl to come "unglued" and to "bite and fight".   Much to my surprise, she kept her magnificent claws locked one to each of two barbed wires, and her free wing perfectly still.  Her beak however did send me a greeting of "clack,  clack,  can you help me back?"
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The Steel Glare With No Soul

The steel glare from her eyes stayed locked on mine and I could see into hers.   What I saw, were the brilliant colors of polished gold and black with no soul visible in their depths.
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Torn Flesh and Hopeless Entanglement

I could see the flesh of the wing was torn and the feathers and flesh were hopelessly entangled with the barb of the wire.  The bones of the wing while showing, seemed to be intact.   I had a linoleum knife in the tool box, so I retrieved it to see if I could release the feathers from the barbed wire.  I placed my left gloved hand over the face of the owl to keep her calm and protect her from seeing what I had to do.   The owl didn't flinch.  With the linoleum knife in the right hand I began to work the blooded, wet feathers away from the barb.  A few minutes later the wing was free and I am holding the giant bird in front of me, its wings spread wide as it could reach.

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The Owl Crunched Down

Suddenly, the owl crunched down on my gloved finger as if to say "it is time to turn me loose now".    I raised her high above the fence and shoved her forward into the air and released.   She caught the air under her huge wings and settled to the ground about twenty feet on the other side of the fence and turned about to face me.  A lot more staring takes place.  I have done all I can think of to do for the moment so I wish her well and leave. 

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Sinbad The Cowdog Makes Observation

Sinbad The Cowdog is observing all this and I am hoping he doesn't have an idea in his head to investigate.  We return to the house and I can observe the owl still in the same location for a period of about two hours.  Apparently resting from the ordeal.

She Flew The Coop and Gave a Hoot

The next time I look, the owl has "flown the coop."  If the wing heals and the infection passes, I expect the owl will "give a hoot" late at night as she checks for crickets and mice under our guard light.

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The Caliche Times Vol  2, No  5     9/9/99

 

It Went Bump in The Night

You just never can tell what may go bump in the night.   About 4 am I was awakened by a noise that sounded like something ran into the air conditioning unit outside the house.  So I came to full attention and rushed to the window to see if this was a trophy armadillo.  I knew it was possible to see a little with the twilight produced by the guard light and it would probably be well to check on this.  As I peered through the opening of the curtains, there was an image of something tall and dark with a long tail.  As my eyes adjusted to the low light,  I could see something with a long tail passing from view and disappearing around the corner of the house.  I'm thinking with a tail like that, it must be one of our weaner - heiferettes that are in the lot.   Well, at least they were in the lot, I must have failed to latch a gate chain.  
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Cows on The Honor System

I then rush to the front of the house where automatic lights were beginning to come on.  There I could see one cow, one calf and one long-tailed heifer, all red.
Well, these cows are not mine, so I figure they must be my neighbor's "cows on the honor system" .  These cows are poor, this may have been the first green grass they have eaten in over two months.   I don't mind sharing the grass with them, but on a freshly water lawn, cow tracks a few inches deep changes the appearance of it somehow.
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Sinbad Doesn't let Guard Duties Interfere With Naps

Through the window, I could see the cows and nearby within a few feet was Sinbad The Cowdog all curled up asleep.  Well, with a guard dog on duty as alert as Sinbad, I knew I could take my time getting dressed.  I could see the cows weren't going to bother his nap and he didn't care if they ate the grass.
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"Sinbad, you need to project better"

After I got dressed, I went outside with a broom in one hand and a flash light in the other.  I woke up Sinbad and said a few word like "come on Sinbad, let's get these cows out of the yard".   So, I made a few runs at the cows bouncing the broom on the ground and hollering "get out of here".  Well, they didn't seem to understand me, so I tried it again.  The cows moved back a few feet.  I said "OK, Sinbad, sic'um.  Nothing happened, so I told Sinbad, "If you will stand in front of me and bark you could project better and exude more confidence."
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The Eyes of the Heifer Told a Story

With all three cows holding their ground and facing me and Sinbad, I noticed the eyes of the heifer.  The heifer only went where the others went because she needed to hear the others and smell their tracks to know where to go.  She was blind in both eyes.   This heifer may have been blind from birth, I couldn't see any pupils in her pink blank eyes.   Now I could better understand why the heifer ran into a large air conditioner close to our bedroom. 
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"Sinbad, we have to have a good plan."

So, I told Sinbad, "This blind cow makes it a little harder to drive these cows.  We have to concentrate on driving the sighted cow and calf and hope the blind one can follow."   The concept was good but the implementation of the plan didn't go smoothly.   We could drive the sighted cow and calf for a short distance, but when they stopped to watch us, the blind heifer couldn't tell where the others were and in panic would run headlong into the barbed wire fence on either side of the road.  Me and Sinbad tired of this in a hurry and didn't want to hurt the heifer and handicap her more that she already was.   We left them to graze the tall Johnson Grass along side the road.  Sinbad, lacking respect from these strays,  went back to finish his nap.  Rabbits are more fun to chase anyway, at least they will run when chased.
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Terms Defined

Brush Hog - a type of tractor-pulled weed shredder.   The term Brush Hog used in this case as a general descriptive name and not a brand name.

Cows on the honor system – cows that know that they can jump the old fence around your place but know if they are not back by breakfast they might be sold.

Exude - in this case it means, "Sinbad, say it like you mean it.  Show these cows this is your territory."

Flown the Coop - flew away.

Give a Hoot - give a hooting owl sound or just care about what happens.

Headlong - she ran head first with considerable speed into the fence.

Heiferettes -   heifers that have reached breeding age but have not been bred.

Horned Toads - usually called Horny Toads, are really Horned Lizards.  Their favorite food is ants.   They lay soft white eggs in the soil that later hatch into very small Horny Toads.

Long tailed heifers usually heifers, 20 months or older that are of breeding age. Tails are long enough to touch the ground in some cases.

Lot - Cow lot or cattle corral.

Louisiana Tom - man that works for me.  He spent a lot of years in oil field work in Louisiana.

Papiermache Nests - honey-comb structures built by red wasps, yellow jacket wasps.  Better known as wasp nests, are made from a cellulose bearing plant such as any woody material that a wasp can do a scraping from.  The scrapings are mixed with a little wasp spit which when combined with the scrapings and deposited one chew at a time on the honey-comb structure makes a glutinous deposit that drys into a very tough and flexible papiermache-like material.

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Pass on Byto die.
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Pink blank eyesred cows sometimes suffer from a disease called Pink Eye.  If not treated will result in damage to the eyes and loss of eyesight.

Poor - not well fed, a condition sometimes apparent in Ace Reed's cartoon cows.

Sic'um - to me it means, "Go get'um Sinbad".  To Sinbad it obviously means nothing.

Sugar Ants - little black ants that sneak into the kitchen when you aren't looking and look for goodies.

Strays - cows on the loose, looking for that place where the grass is greener.

Trophy Armadillo - an unusually large armadillo.   One large enough to wake up Sinbad The Cowdog.

Weaners or weanies – calves that have reached 6 months of age and are being weaned for a period of 6 weeks.
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  Terms coined at Davis Elm Creek Ranch 

 

 

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